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Consumer Reviews of Heat Transfer Products boilers

Popularity:
#50  of 67 brands of boilers

23% of customers recommend
2 of 5 stars 345 reviews

  • Very Satisfied
    67
  • Somewhat Satisfied
    14
  • Neutral
    93
  • Somewhat Unsatisfied
    9
  • Very Unsatisfied
    162

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Date created: 2011-02-28 Name: merle D
Location: N E Iowa

Satisfaction Rating:

1 of 5 stars Very Unsatisfied

Review:
"Junk"
What a piece of shit. Now the blower motor went out! Thinking of buying one.. I'll sell you a used one for scrap price and that would be priced too high. Nothing but trouble from day one. It needs constant maint. and cleaning, and this is not something that the home owener can do. If I had to do it over again I would put in the cheapest 80% boiler I could fine and it would be a hell of a lot better. The dealer that sold it to me does not sell them anymore but still services them much as he hates to. DO NOT BUY!!!



Date created: 2011-02-26 Name: Steve - BELTLINE HEATING
Location: Grand Rapids Mi

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Blame the boiler"
David problems - He now has a bad heat exchanger - Notice that the boiler is to blame for this. NOT that he has had constant problems with this boiler. could it be that the boiler is not properly Installed thus causing all of his problems. I will bet that If he sent me pictures of his install I would find many things wrong. If you are having constant service problems or constantly replacing parts the problem is NOT with the boiler but with the installation.


Date created: 2011-02-25 Name: Tom
Location: St Louis, MO

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Homer is throwing off the review results"
Every time Homer answers a question he posts as "Very Satisfied" This gets logged into the system and even though he is one person, he gets multiple votes throwing off the review ratings for the Munchkin brand furnaces. This should be fixed and if it can not be fixed, then Homer can you please post with "Neutral" selected from now on when you give advise? Thanks.


Date created: 2011-02-25 Name: J.RUSSO
Location: Lake George, NY

Satisfaction Rating:

1 of 5 stars Very Unsatisfied

Review:
"DON'T BUY A MUNCHKIN OR PINNACLE BOILER"
To my detriment, when I renovated my home, I let a relative handle the selection and purchase of the so called high efficiency Pinnacle system which is also known as the Munchkin. This was the worst heating system imaginable. There was always something malfunctioning and I spent about $3,000 in repairs over 5 years. I finally had the system yanked out in 2010 and replaced it with a Utica. The manufacturer and area rep were of no help. If I were purchasing a new home with one of these systems in it, I wouldn't buy it unless they replaced this type of heating system first! I save the old munchkin. Maybe, this spring we can bring it to the local firing range for target shooting and then set it on fire. That's about the only good use for it! DON'T BUY THIS TYPE OF BOILER!!!!! RUN FAST AND FAR FROM THESE SYSTEMS!!!!!


Date created: 2011-02-22 Name: David
Location: Salem, Virginia

Satisfaction Rating:

1 of 5 stars Very Unsatisfied

Review:
"Dont buy it"
This was a big mistake. 8 years old and the heat exchanger is now cracked and it cost alot of money to get people out to fix this that realy had no clue to munchkin. It sucks.


Date created: 2011-02-21 Name: David
Location: Salem, Va

Satisfaction Rating:

1 of 5 stars Very Unsatisfied

Review:
"Dont buy it"
I bought a munchkin high efficiciiency boiler with the "925" controller 8 years ago. Every year it's been service call after service call. Not to mention having to reset the the unit over and over again when I came home with no heat. Now they tell me the heat exchanger has a crack in it. This was the worste home improvement that I have ever done. Don't buy it.


Date created: 2011-02-12 Name: Steve - BELTLINE HEATING

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Adrian"
Adrian - I will let you in on a little secret. The Munchkin boiler does let you know there is a problem - They are called error codes. But you have to be there when it happens to see them displayed. Last time I checked You always have to be in your car when the check engine light comes on to see it. If you were somewhere else while your car was driving itself - You wouldn't get a warning either. AGAIN - if you are loosing motors or electronics your boiler is not installed properly. Steve - Beltline Heating


Date created: 2011-02-11 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Cracking the Boiler Case"
I mentioned in an earlier post about partially opening the boiler case to condition the boiler intake air. I do want to state that by doing so, you defeat Category 4 venting requirements. IT IS IMPERATIVE that if you operate a Munchkin without the cover or with the cover partially open that you have a FirstAlert CO detector in the same room as the boiler. Please see, the Minnesota account of a NTI Trinity boiler that was improperly piped on the air intake, which lead to a death from CO poisoning. Exhaust gases from the boiler were coming back into the air intake vent. However, the air intake vent didn't connect to the boiler. The incoming air only went into the boiler room and the boiler pulled it combustion air from the boiler room rather than from outside. The boiler room filled with CO because of exhaust gas reversion. A tragic story. It is probably a good idea to have a C0 detector in the boiler room, anyway. CO detectors are cheap and save lives. A CO detector has a useful live of about 5 yrs. and then need replacing.


Date created: 2011-02-11 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"The KISS Principle"
For the dear readers that are wondering what the KISS principle is--it's Keep It Simple, Stupid--so when it breaks down Stupid can fix it. But Adrian, where would we get the cars that get 46 miles to a gallon of gas? It is funny tho. A goal to strive for.---Geoff- Are these coffee grounds adhering to the HX (heat exchanger) or are they loose? Are they on the bottom of the HX or all around the HX? As far as conditioning the intake air with the concentric venting, I don't think that it will improve the situation as the exhaust gases don't have a lot of latent heat. As far as the condensate trap being the source of the acidic vapor getting into the blower, it may be, considering that HTP wants you to tilt the boiler toward the rear(for better drainage?). The amount of vapor getting into the blower from the condensate trap is dependent on the cross sectional area of the condensate exposed to the HX. A 1" cross sectional area will produce less vapor than a 2' cross sectional area. There might be a lot of wetness (drops etc.) on the inside of the shell of the HX which would increase the cross sectional area and the production of acidic vapor, I don't know. I do know that the colder the return water to the boiler the more condensate is produced. (Also, the more efficient the boiler is.) If you have looked at your flue on a cold day you will see the vapor condensing as it exits the flue. (steam, colloquially speaking) What I think, is that vapor in the flue cools (more dense) and falls back down the flue pushing the acidic vapor in the HX up the fuel plenum and into the blower where is condenses and does it's damage. This is why a shorter exhaust vent is more of a problem, the gases cool quicker. There is also back draft. A shorter exhaust vent is less resistant to back draft flows. I would still want to increase the post purge on the blower to push all the acidic combustion vapor out of the HX and flue vent replacing it with non acidic air. Air at 10 degrees has low humidity, certainly much less than exhaust gases in the HX. Replace that acidic air with fresh air, increase your post purge on your blower. Four blowers is a bit much and shouldn't be tolerated. Does anyone else have any ideas on this, speak up.


Date created: 2011-02-10 Name: Geoff Marshall
Location: Little Deer Isle, ME

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"4th Blower!!!"
I looked through my records the other day and was surprised to find that I'm on my 4th blower with the 140M. The first blower was replaced because it was so noisy during the post purge. I bought the $200 Equiguard policy on the 140 which paid for one blower but they went bankrupt and it took almost a year for a check to show up. None of the blowers had much corrosion inside so I don't think they are the source of the coffee grounds. I thought about prolonging the post-purge but I think most of the moisture is from the hot water still in the condensate trap; no ideas come to mind for how to deal with this. My non-contact thermometer showed the Dungs gas valve to be 10F one day; which is why I switched to the concentric-- I was hoping the additional heating of the intake air would help and so far, it seems to be better. But if I bumped up the post purge I'd be back where I started. I used Permatex hi-temp and put the boiler back in service after about 1 hour.

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