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Consumer Reviews of HTP boilers

Popularity:
#49  of 67 brands of boilers

23% of customers recommend
2 of 5 stars 361 reviews

  • Very Satisfied
    70
  • Somewhat Satisfied
    15
  • Neutral
    94
  • Somewhat Unsatisfied
    9
  • Very Unsatisfied
    173

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Date created: 2012-02-03 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada
Years owned: 7

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"OOUGA-OOUGA--OOUGA--WARNING-WARNING---Munchkin's Shutting Down"
BCS--St. Paul, mn---say what??? Water dripping anywhere from the Munchkin is a serious, serious problem. That should be your first concern and be fixed, pronto. The source of the dripping water must be determined. Is water is coming from inside the boiler (not likely as the probe has a gasket on it) or from outside the boiler? How did you do a condensate flush? With an enema tube? I guess you can put a tube into the spark port and fill the combustion chamber with water, but that ain't how I do it. To do it right you need to remove the gas valve, blower and burner tube so that you can get into the combustion chamber and hose it out. When was the last time you did a major cleaning of your boiler? I find about 3yrs is max. First, all the spark igniter or rectifier probe is, is just a piece of wire in an insulator, unless the ceramic is cracked it doesn't need to be replaced. Just clean them with 200 grit wet & dry sandpaper (read my earlier posts on cleaning them and on adjusting the gap). The gap on the spark igniter must be at least the thickness of 2 quarters placed together. If the gap is too small, you will have intermittent ignitions and f09 codes. When the boiler start up, the control board starts the spark and then opens the gas valve and the gas flows into the burner tube and out in to the combustion chamber and ignites. If the spark doesn't spark because the moisture is grounding out the electricity to the probe or the gap is too small, ignition doesn't occur immediately, and the gas build up in the combustion chamber and when it does ignite, you get an explosion.---NOW--let's deal with the water. If it is condensate from combustion building up in the combustion chamber and grounding out the spark you need a major flush of the boiler trap to make sure the condensate flows freely. However, it you have a condensate neutralizer on you boiler, it may be plugged up, stopping the flow of condensate out of the boiler. Remove the tubing from the condensate outlet on the boiler and place it into a 5 gal pail and let the condensate drain into the bucket. You should get one to two gal of condensate a day in the bucket. In bad situations (plugged condensate drain) you can look into the viewing port and often see a waterline across the (back) target refractory. The other cause of water buildup is if the heat exchanger is leaking because of a crack, etc. Which is it? Boiler water or condensate? Test the dripping water from your spark port with a ph strip. If the ph is 3.0-4.0 (acidic)it is condensate. If the strip says 7.0 (neutral) or about that it is boiler water. No glycol systems just water systems only, please. If the water is coming from outside of the boiler look to the header, nipple connection or overflow valve. There was a problem with dripping nipples and pressure relief valve about the time you bought your boiler. These can be fixed. P.S. You can clean the probes until you are blue in the face and it won't make a difference if moisture is grounding out the spark or making it intermittent. As far as the spark probe being to far back that a new one on me, but what do I know. Good Luck. Perhaps, the Techs meant that the probe was to far away from the burner tube and should be moved closer to the tube? But it has been working fine for 7 yrs.



Date created: 2012-01-28 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada
Years owned: 7

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Alan Z. --Revisited Again"
Alan if your boiler is less than 3 years old, the blower is under warranty and should cost you nothing for a new one. The blower is matched to the model of your boiler, different models = different blowers. The control board is the same. The board is programed for your model. All replacement parts should match your model. The new blower should have a metal impeller (fan). If it is not the harness, I would have trusted the Fault Code and seriously considered the blower first. Look, maybe you have an older boiler that was install that has a plastic impeller and it has separated. To the wholesaler and distributor, it is first in first out, so maybe by mistake that didn't happen and you got an older boiler with a plastic impeller. If you replace the blower, look inside and see. HTP warranted the blower for 3 years. If it is a little over 3 years, sometimes HTP, out of customer consideration, will graciously replace the blower at no cost to you. You can call or have your boiler guy call and discuss this with the tech guys and customer service. They're good people.


Date created: 2012-01-28 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Sheila -Revisited"
Sheila--Milford, PA--When you get the Vision 1 manual, pay close attention to the ots connections to the control board plug. Make sure that the Lt. Green ots wires are put into the correct holes on the plug and that the molex connectors are pushed into the plug in the right orientation (black marks on the molex connector facing up). Turn off the power to the boiler and open the cabinet and tug the ots wires outward from the plug to make sure that they are seated securely on the pins on the control board. I'm big on this electrical power polarity issue. Make sure your polarity is correct. See earlier posts. Do all these things. I would prefer using the Vision 1 ots as it saves on energy costs. If every thing suggested is by the book, look for a faulty control board. It is probably under warranty so be pronto about it.


Date created: 2012-01-28 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada
Years owned: 7

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Alan Z. --Revisited"
Alan Z.-Anchorage, ak--- Electrical Polarity (the white wire is connected to the silver screw and the black wire is connected to the brass screw on the receptacle on your wall outlet and the connection to the boiler's white and black wires as well a the green wire is-- important. Service persons take for granted that the 110 volt wiring is correct, so they don't check it. Improper polarity can cause problems with the control board. Read earlier posts on polarity.


Date created: 2012-01-28 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada
Years owned: 7

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Gary Wandschneider--Sheila--Alan Z."
Gary Wandschneider--Heber UT---Gary, you can call Heat Transfer Products and talk to the Tech there about your problems. I can't imagine spending $1000 each year replacing parts, etc. and not having your boilers working properly. I doesn't make sense to me. You have an installation problem. Either you hire someone who's knowledgeable or you figure it out on your own. No matter which company's boiler you install if you have an installation error, that company's boiler is going to be affected. READ-"Modern Hydronic Heating" by John Siegenthaler, pe (Plumbing Engineer) and check your system installation against the book. ps- ignore the math unless you have had Advanced Algebra and Trig. Installing a low tech boiler is more forgiving if there are installation errors, a high tech boiler like the Munchkin isn'T.---- Sheila-Milford, PA---Sheila, first, replacing 3 Outdoor Temperature Sensors (ots) should tell you that your problem isn't the sensor. An ots is a temperature variable resistor that changes resistance with a change in temp. The ots should be mounted where it truly measures the outdoor temp., not in direct sunlight, not near a heat source which may effect the reading. Secondly, there is limit as to how long the connection wire from the boiler to the ots is, don't exceed this length. Wire has resistance which adds to the ots resistance. The connections should be good and tight at the boiler and ots. Make sure that the ots connection wire is the proper gauge 18 ga minimum and the wire leads are not grounded to each other. The ots establishes a Reset curve for the control board. The ots tell the board that the outdoor temp is such and such, so that the boiler only heat water up to a certain temp. necessary to overcome the loss of heat through the building envelope, thus saving money on heating costs. YES-you can disconnect it if you choose to, you just lose the reset function. In the Vision 1 manual is a synopsis of the Vision 1 function. There are 4 parameters that can be adjusted for the reset curve. Download the manual at HTProducts.com. Disconnect the ots at the boiler not the sensor.----Alan Z.-Anchorage, ak---$400 that seems like a good deal to me. This is an honest company that want to satisfy you. This is a temperature issue. You're pulling really cold air from outside into the boiler and it is effecting the expansion of the metal component in the boiler compartment. I don't think it is the control board or the blower. Look to the harness between the two. I would replace the harness first. Do the least expensive thing first. Check for exhaust reversion, any moisture or pitting of the aluminum components in the boiler, make sure the the intake air to the boiler is not near a dryer vent, etc. Read these posts about venting and harnesses. I don't know what weird sound like. Go though your boiler commissioning again-Set the co on the gas valve and check the supply gas pressure, pipe sizing, intake and exhaust venting, etc.


Date created: 2012-01-27 Name: Steven Whitbeck - BELTLINE HEATING
Location: Grand Rapids MI.

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"BELTLINE HEATING"
Sheila - The ods is not a Munchkin part - other brands use the same sensor. Yes you can unhook the sensor wires at either end and put wire nuts on the wires. ( two ) But the boiler will run at maximum temperature. It is best to replace it. See if they will sell you a new sensor at their shop and if you can use a screwdriver you can change it yourself.


Date created: 2012-01-27 Name: Steven Whitbeck - BELTLINE HEATING
Location: Grand Rapids MI.

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"BELTLINE HEATING"
Alan - It sounds to me like a bad blower. Call other companies for their price. How is your boiler vented? Is it concentric vented - If it is then change it so there is at least 18 inches vertical separation between the intake and the exhaust pipes. Exhaust gas recirculation will destroy the blower and other components. Steve


Date created: 2012-01-26 Name: Gary Wandschneider
Location: Heber it

Satisfaction Rating:

1 of 5 stars Very Unsatisfied

Review:
"Worst decision I ever made trusting Munchkin boilers"
Have two Munchkin boilers in my home in Utah. These boilers are now about 6 years old, and have never worked. I spend about $1000 each year trying to keep them running with no help from the company just more excuses. I would never recommend these to anyone unless you enjoy repair bills.


Date created: 2012-01-25 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Mea Culpa, Mea Culpa, Mea Culpa"
Homer, you blew it. Please ignore my suggestion to pump into the expansion tank. What I meant to say and didn't was that you never-ever pump into an expansion tank. Funny things happen in the system when you do that, like pressure differences in the system that can drop to near 0 psi. So, you always pump away from an expansion tank. The tank connection should always be on the inlet side of the pump.--SHANE--My reasoning was this--Although the static pressure (when the boiler is not running) in the system is 12psi at all points in the system. If the pump is on the supply side nipple, pumping away from the boiler and the pressure switch and, also, the pump is pumping into the expansion tank, the dynamic pressure (the pressure created by the pump when the system is running)can drop system pressure in parts of the heating loop to less than 10 psi causing a pr0 fault code. If this pressure drop is marginal, near 10 psi at the pressure switch, you could have intermittent pr0 fault codes. This is especially probable if the pump is mismatched (too powerful). These are my random thoughts.


Date created: 2012-01-24 Name: Homer
Location: Nevada

Satisfaction Rating:

3 of 5 stars Neutral

Review:
"Shane Kairalla Revisited"
The easy way to tell if it is the pressure switch is to get some jumper cables at Radio Shack and jump the switch terminals while the wiring harness is connect to the switch. Do this at the switch when you have a pr0 fault code. If the boiler turns on it is either one of two things: low water in the system or faulty pressure switch. If the boiler doesn't turn on when you do this it is either one of two things: the harness is lacking continuity between the control board and switch or a faulty 925 control board. Replace with a 926 control board if replacement is necessary. Always do the cheapest and easiest thing first. If you have low water pressure in the system drain your expansion tank down and inflate the tank to 15 psi with air through the Schrader valve on the bottom of the tank under the red or blue cap. On a two story house the system pressure should be between 12-15 psi.---Lord help me, but I got to mention it. The boiler pump should be pumping into the 1 1/4" return brass nipple on the boiler and not pumping away from the supply brass nipple on the boiler. The supply is the 1 1/4" brass nipple that is closest to you when you are standing in front of the boiler. Lastly, always place the expansion tank connection to the system after the pump so that you pump into the expansion tank and not away from the expansion tank. Gasp, I done. pump

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